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Volunteer Service May Include:
  • Education in a Rural School

  • Rural Community Development

  • Healthcare for children with disabilities

  • Animal Welfare and Public Health

  • Youth Development for rural, underserved and orphaned children

  • Environmental Projects with Indigenous peoples

 

 

Ethical Service & Research in Peru

As an IPSL service-learning participant in Cusco, Peru, you will have the opportunity to perform volunteer service in one of several local partner organizations/agencies. IPSL does its best to match your skills and interests to the placement, but please remember that the notion of service is, first and foremost, to respond to the needs of others. You will play a role not only by actively participating with a determined role among the team members, but also by enriching the projects and programs with your knowledge, experience, and hard work.  Therefore, each project or program is improved and enriched with your participation. Your impact on other people's lives will be powerful and sustainable, even if you don't see the results right away.

IPSL and our students support and serve in an on-going, sustainable fashion a limited and select set of organizations whose needs have been identified by the organizations themselves.

 

 

IPSL and our students support and serve in an on-going, sustainable fashion a limited and select set of organizations whose needs have been identified by the organizations themselves.

 

What does Service-Learning look like in Peru?


IPSL service-learning placements are determined, in part, by student interests and skills (and, in some cases, language abilities), but primarily by community needs. Central to the philosophy of service-learning is the notion of service. Service-learning is not the same as an internship or practicum although it may look very similar. The service in service-learning may or may not be career-related. An internship is designed mostly so that the student will benefit by learning about his/ her future profession. In contrast, in service-learning, the outcome of the student's work - that is, the service – is as important as the student’s learning. There are — or should be - identifiable benefits to those served. This reciprocity is a key component in international service-learning.

IPSL Service Placements:


IPSL's service-learning placements are in agencies that have sprung up from the grassroots, where locals have identified a need, and where the change effort is owned by them. What they need is additional assistance of all kinds from the outside. So, IPSL participants should remember that they are stepping into a moving stream of initiatives and efforts that began long ago, and that will continue after the participant departs. Your work is important, but your individual contributions may not be visible for many years. Change takes time. In the meantime, you are fulfilling a need, and the need is huge.

A single agency may need hands-on assistance from IPSL participants (direct service) or assistance in the background building capacity (indirect service) so that the agency can one day experience more stability in the delivery of its services. Either way, both direct and indirect service are needed to accomplish the goals. Each is valuable. In actuality, because nearly all non-profits experience resource scarcity, IPSL participants do a little bit of everything. And this is as it should be. Nothing says "I'm a partner in your community" more than a willingness on the part of a service-learning participant not only to do higher tasks, but also occasionally to pick up a broom and sweep the floor so that the setting is clean and presentable. Such actions serve to break down stereotypes about Americans, and build relationships based on equality. That is why many of the service agencies with which we work have been our partners for years.

The IPSL website lists areas of service, and a few examples for each program site. This list is not exhaustive, nor static. The types of work listed do not each represent a distinct agency; they represent the types of work that IPSL participants can expect to encounter at the different service agencies with which we work. The number and selection of service agencies may change at any time. Sometimes there are logistical (transportation, scheduling, etc.) issues that arise that complicate certain service agency placements and make them unworkable. Sometimes students need to be proficient in the local language in order to serve in a particular agency. Also, we do not place too many students in any one agency. Doing so would undermine the immersion environment for which IPSL programs are known.

 

Volunteer Service that Addresses Real Human Needs


As an IPSL service-learning participant in Cusco, Peru, you will have the opportunity to do volunteer work in one of several local agencies. We do our best to match your skills and interests to the placement, but please remember that the notion of service is, first and foremost, to respond to the needs of others. You will play a role not only by actively participating with a determined role among the team members, but also by enriching the projects and programs with your knowledge, experience, and hard work.  Therefore, each project or program is improved and enriched with your participation. Your impact on other people's lives will be powerful and sustainable, even if you don't see the results right away.

The IPSL service-learning program in Cusco, Peru offers students the opportunity to experience service in a city where, despite significant economic consolidation in recent years, needs in the areas of economic development, human services, and the environment continue to be felt. Students in Cusco can make a contribution that benefits the environment, disabled children, micro-business owners, artisans, and other social groups. Participants in the program will work 12 - 15 hours per week at shelters, at educational institutions, in high Andean communities, in natural reserves and for other organizations that dedicate their efforts to the development of the least advantaged.


Volunteer Service Examples

Following are examples of agencies where IPSL students have served in the past or may be able to serve. Other service placements may be available. Your placement will be determined by community and agency needs, logistics, as well as your interests, goals, and skills.
 

                                                    

CHILDREN AND EDUCATION

PUBLIC HEALTH AND AMINAL WELFARE

The Civil Protection Association of Cusco Animals works together with a non-profit to eradicate animal suffering through the implementation of veterinary campaigns, mass sterilization campaigns and community and public awareness campaigns on the issue of animal welfare and responsible pet ownership. They run an adoption shelter and address issues of public health and education for the benefit of street animals and pets within the Cusco, Peru area.

CENTER FOR NUTRITIONAL WELLNESS AND EARLY STIMULATION 

The Center helps children at risk of malnutrition and malnourished children between the ages of 6 months to 3 years. At the moment 25 children are being helped, 15 boys and 10 girls.Volunteers help children and their mothers to complete everyday chores such as feeding, grooming, teaching and early stimulation. Volunteers collaborate on activities  to develop in the receiving center such as feeding, clothing changing, helping nurses, helping in the kitchen, exercises and games, etc. Other projects that students may develop are redecorating the dining room by painting or developing the design of the playground area. 

RURAL PUBLIC SCHOOL

The school provides primary education to 70 children with limited financial resources, whose ages range from 3 to 14 years. In this rural community near Cusco, volunteers have been supporting the majority of the community’s infrastructural improvement. Volunteers have conducted repairs, painted, cleaned, and upgraded the kitchen and the library, as well as improved the greenhouse and facilitated the donation of compost.  Volunteers teach a basic English course for both students and their parents, along with more cultural and recreational programming. Volunteering at the School requires a great playful spirit, humor, creativity and a large room for love in your heart. 

Possible Volunteer work may include:

PHYSICAL OR MENTAL HEALTH PROMOTION AREA:  

·       Hygiene instruction - hand washing and tooth brushing program

·       Greenhouse implementation (for including vegetables on their diet)

·       Nutritional education sessions (Healthy food preparation)

·       Healthy habits awareness

·       Life skills

·       Art therapy 

ENVIROMENTAL AREA:

·       The three “Rs” awareness (reducing, reusing and recycling) 

·       Teaching the difference between organic and inorganic waste 

·       Compost production

·       Forestation projects

EDUCATION:

·       Teaching English or other topics

·       Training the teachers

JUVENILE HOME FOR BOYS AND JUVENILE HOME FOR GIRLS

The separate residential homes serve boys between the ages of 5 to 12 years old and girls between the ages of 5 to 12, who are in state of material and moral neglect. They are usually referred by the courts as minors, for reasons of orphanhood, alcoholic families, social risk, family or sexual violence. The home and school provides comprehensive care. Volunteers assist the children with school work; collaborate through teaching English; teach life skills workshops; help organize leisure and recreational activities, social reintegration workshops and support occupational training workshops. Volunteers can help the students participate in different workshops that aim to teach skills such as shoe making and wood work.  

SPECIAL EDUCATION

This is a public school, dedicated to the rehabilitation of deaf and blind children or hearing and visual impaired with multiple sensory disabilities. Currently the Center is home to 76 children, between the ages of 3 and 11 years old.  Volunteers help work with the teachers assisting children in teaching basic skills, gaining mobility, early stimulation and collaborating in the classrooms. Volunteering at this center requires patience and willingness to learn while working with children with special conditions.

YOUNG MOTHERS AND CHILDREN

RESIDENTIAL CARE CENTER FOR TEEN MOTHERS

This center is the home of 13 adolescent mothers between the ages of 12 and 18, with their children (ages among newly born to 7 years old). The Center has 17 people working as a permanent staff, they are divided in educational areas, nursing, cleaning and trainers of occupational workshops for mothers who want to learn sewing techniques. The volunteers will provide help the staff in charge of the childrens care while their mothers are working.

    

HEALTH

CENTER FOR CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES

This institution is directed by the Brothers of the Hospital Order of St. John of God and a staff of health workers, dedicated to serving children and adults with disabilities. Volunteers are involved in supporting children who are learning to eat, accompanying hospitalized children, taking them to school, celebrating with children at parties, helping with food preparation and with laundry services.  Volunteers will learn about caring for children with disabilities involving their nutrition, education, grooming and entertainment.  There are also opportunities to develop programs such as music or art therapy activities.

SUBSTANCE ABUSE HEALTHCARE INSTITUTE 

This institution is dedicated to the care of both male and female patients with problems of alcohol, drug addiction, gambling and mental  The institution has poor facilities, but has the support of qualified physicians and staff. Volunteers become active members of the patient care staff, motivating their recovery, helping in educational programs, drawing therapy workshops, reading workshops, etc. 

Mailing Address:

 

4110 SE HAWTHORNE BLVD., #200

PORTLAND, OR 97214

info@ipsl.org

Tel. +1.503.395.IPSL (4775)

Fax. +1.503.954.1881

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© 2018 IPSL

A Registered Social-Benefit Organization