tanzania

Academics

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Course Offerings
 
  • Beginning Kiswahili  (credit or not for credit)
  • COSA (Community Organizing and Social Activism) in Tanzania 
  • HIV/AIDS in Tanzania
  • Introduction to Human Rights in Africa
  • Sustainable Community Development in Tanzania
  • Global Health and Epidemiology
  • Peace Studies/Conflict Resolution
  • Tanzanian Socialism in Transition
* Some courses may not be offered during a given term. Please inquire. 
 
 
 
Travel and Excursions that Broaden Your Perspective
Travel is an essential part of studying abroad. Taking knowledge from the classroom and applying it through direct observation allows for greater classroom comprehension and cultural understanding.

 

Excursions Include:

Arusha City Tour
Day excursion to visit the many cultural and historical sites. Arusha is a major international diplomatic hub and is the home of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda and hosts the African Court on Human and Peoples' Rights. 


Tarangire National Park
The closest national park to Arusha – northern Tanzania’s safari capital – Tarangire is often overlooked by safari goers, despite offering the opportunity to explore many diverse wildlife habitats within a few hours of the city. It is the home of the Elephant and provides a protective environment to one of the largest herds of African elephants in a sanctuary preserve.

City Museums, Masai Market and Snake Park

 

Other Opportunities for independent Excursions

Dar es Salaam 

Visit the huge, cosmopolitan city of Dar to visit museums and historical places as well as get a different flavor of Tanzania.

 

Zanzibar - The Spice Islands!

An Archipelago of gorgeous limestone islands with turquoise water, Zanzibar and it's ancient city of Stone Town is a fascinating blend of African, Indian and Arabic influences and is the home of the largest Muslim community in Tanzania. With its rich and varied culture, its beautiful white sand beaches, tropical wildlife and spices galore, it is one of the "must sees" of Africa.

 

Mt. Meru or Mt. Kilimanjaro

Trek with a guide up the trails of sacred Mt Meru or Mt Kilimanjaro (the highest mountain in Africa) to experience the vast variety of environments that make Tanzania so exciting.

 

IPSL students in Tanzania may also work with program staff on-site to arrange for independent travel to other areas of Tanzania. As with all travel, weather and other travel hindrances can affect the exact destinations of excursions. In such cases, IPSL program staff make every effort to find suitable replacement itineraries.

 

“This program was so much better than I could have imagined. I truly felt like I was immersed and accepted into this new culture. My patience and flexibility in situations has improved immensely, and I have a whole new appreciation and respect for what organizations do and how they are run.”

Niki Gates, IPSL Arusha, Tanzania Program, Fall 2014

IPSL TANZANIA  

The semester curriculum offers a Swahili Language & Culture course, as well as COSA (Community Organizing & Social Activism) in Tanzania, which is the IPSL Service-Learning Reflections course. In addition, other courses relevant to current issues in Tanzania are routinely offered.  All courses are taught in English.  

COURSE OFFERINGS
Required Courses

COSA in Tanzania (Community Organizing and Social Activism)

The focus of this course is to explore community organizing and social activism in Tanzania with the goal of learning how to effectively translate these ideas and techniques into a concrete knowledge of social activism (including a practical tool set and the development of a personal ethic of advocacy) that can be applied across cultures, countries, and efforts. The course starts with an overview of social change institutions, explores the history and ethics of international service and moves to the examination of past and current political and social movements and advocacy efforts in Tanzania. Students will learn the theories and practical realities of intercultural service-learning in an African context. This course complements IPSL community service placements and helps students make sense of their international experience in order to develop their intercultural competence. Topics are examined through the prism of hands-on community service in African NGOs and other non-profits and include intercultural communication, the mechanics of African non-profits/NGOs, citizenship in Africa, local civic engagement/advocacy efforts and the exploration of civil society.

Contact Hours: 45

Recommended U.S. Credits: 3

Elective Courses

Students may take 2-3 electives for a maximum of 12 credits.

Beginning Kiswahili (if taken for credit by graduate students, this course will be listed as "Language Across the Curriculum")

Graduate students are strongly encouraged to study the local language, even if it is to audit the course. In order to receive credit for a language course ("Language Across the Curriculum"), graduate students need to combine the language course with a project (to be co-determined by student and faculty). Graduate students may also take the course for no credit.

 

The beginners course is intended for those who do not have any knowledge of Kiswahili or who have little knowledge of speaking and understanding oral Kiswahili. The course begins with elementary lessons such as greetings and self-introduction and finishes with lessons of self - expression in everyday life for example at grocery stores, at bank, at post office, making telephone calls, etc. This course will provide students with a set of communication tools to comprehend and speak about typical social situations. The student will be able to communicate and discuss basic personal history, leisure time activities, work situations and use Swahili for day-to-day activities such as visiting the market and other basic transactions. Essential skills such as asking and answering simple questions will be mastered. This course meets twice per week.

Contact Hours: 45

Recommended U.S. Credits: 3

HIV/AIDS in Tanzania

This theoretical and practical course introduces student to the current and historical context of the impact of HIV/AIDS pandemic in Tanzania. This course will provide information about sexually transmitted Infections and facts about HIV / AIDS in Tanzania. We will explore the Prevention theory and Public health, HIV/AIDS treatment and post infection care. Topics of interest are studied in relation to the current Tanzanian experience in order to understand it and apply that knowledge to the volunteer service in which students will participate during their program in Arusha, Tanzania.

Contact Hours: 45

Recommended U.S. Credits: 3

Introduction to Human Rights in Africa

The course focuses on the concept of human beings as having universal natural rights, and we will explore their history and see what reasons there are for believing that such rights exist. Students then will explore the Universal Declaration on Human Rights. We look at the values underlying human rights and how they constantly develop. Next the course examines the major universal human rights instruments and the mechanisms for their implementation. Following, there is an examination of the major African human rights instruments and the mechanisms for their implementation - beginning with the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights, adopted in 1981. The course delves into the human rights protection mechanism in Tanzania and will examine the institutions; laws and policies; and the role of non-state actors. Finally students explore how Tanzania has complied with its obligations stipulated within different international human rights instruments. 

Contact Hours: 45

Recommended U.S. Credits: 3

Sustainable Community Development in Tanzania

The course will introduce students to the concept and history of community development in Tanzania and East Africa.  The course will discuss the laws, policies and regulations that currently govern development in Tanzania.  Students will examine the makeup of civil society and community service in Tanzania and examine the goals and measurable outcomes towards the country’s development.  Examination and discussion of the goals and achievements of the United Nation’s development goals (MDG’s) will be part of the course.  The class will visit several NGO’S in Arusha and receive lectures from a government speaker to understand more specific data and policies about sustainable development.  Student’s taking this course will gain knowledge and information to help them understand community development in Tanzania and the course will give them the tools to think critically about this complex concept. 

Contact Hours: 45

Recommended U.S. Credits: 3

Global Health and Epidemiology

The purpose of the course is to assist students to see the inter-relatedness of global health and epidemiology, as well as the role of public health institutions in strengthening the global health system. Students will explore:

• the meaning of globalization and how does globalization affect health outcomes;

• the important global diseases and the efforts of the global community to combat them;

• the measures of disease incidence and prevalence, and measures of effect (e.g. relative and absolute risk);

• the basic principles underlying different study designs, including descriptive, ecological, cross-sectional, cohort, case-control and intervention studies;

• the strengths and limitations of different study designs;

• the strengths and limitations of different sources of epidemiological data on health status and health service utilization in Africa 

Contact Hours: 45

Recommended U.S. Credits: 3

Tanzanian Socialism in Transition

This theoretical course introduces the current and historical context of the impact of Nyerere’s socialist experiment of 1967-1985 in Tanzania. This course will provide information about the rise and fall of socialism in Tanzania. We will explore the ideology, structure and implementation of Tanzanian socialism  from the late 60s  to the mid 80s. Topics of interest are studied in relation to the current Tanzanian experience in order to understand it and apply that knowledge to the volunteer service in their service sites, which students will participate during their stay in Arusha, Tanzania.

Contact Hours: 45

Recommended U.S. Credits: 3

Peace Studies/Conflict Resolution

The purpose of the course is to assist students to appreciate that peace-building and conflict resolution is a distinct field of activity that has both a history and a distinct language that not only articulates what is meant by a conflict but, also, the steps needed to resolve it. 

Contact Hours: 45

Recommended U.S. Credits: 3

 *Please note that depending on enrollment one of these courses may not run.

Mailing Address:

 

4110 SE HAWTHORNE BLVD., #200

PORTLAND, OR 97214

info@ipsl.org

Tel. +1.503.395.IPSL (4775)

Fax. +1.503.954.1881

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